homeabout usdoctorsstaffoffice policiesformsrelated linksfaqscontact us

FAQS

Office Policy FAQS

Medical FAQS

Answers

Are we accepting new patients?  Yes

Back to Top

What insurances do you accept? 
We participate with most insurance companies.  The majority of our patients have Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Humana, Bluegrass Family Health, and Aetna but we accept many others.  The insurance environment has become very complex; therefore, we recommend calling your insurance plan provider to verify that we participate with your particular policy.  Unfortunately, we are not currently accepting Medicaid.  Please bring your child’s insurance card to each visit.

Back to Top

What are your office hours? 
Weekdays 8:30 A.M. - 5 P.M. 
Saturday 8:30 A.M. – 12 Noon.
Our first appointment is at 9:00 A.M.                 
Our phones turn off 15 minutes prior to closing and from 1 P.M. – 2 P.M for lunch.

Back to Top

When is your last appointment of the day?
The last well-child check is at 4 P.M. 
The last sick visit is at 4:30 P.M.

Back to Top

Are co-payments required at time of service?
Yes, we request payment be made at the time service is rendered and may be made with cash, check, or Visa/Mastercard.  If for some reason this is not possible, a bill will be sent to you.  Do not keep a sick child away from needed care because you aren’t prepared to pay at the time.  Feel free to discuss issues with our billing staff.

Back to Top

What should we do about questions after office hours?
We encourage routine phone calls to be made only during office hours.  You will receive the answers we want you to know by our well trained nurses.  Questions regarding medications (dosages, etc) can be answered most efficiently by a 24 hour pharmacy.  For emergencies, urgent illnesses, or urgent questions (something that cannot wait through the night or weekend), a physician is available 24 hours a day.  After office hours, please call 859-323-0077 to reach the University of Kentucky Medical Triage service.  A registered pediatric nurse will answer your call, provide advice, and notify the physician on call if necessary.  We ask that you use discretion, as the service charges us for every call made.  

Back to Top

Will my insurance cover a visit for the flu vaccine?
Each insurance plan is different; therefore, we highly recommend checking with your insurance provider first.  Many insurance companies consider the flu shot as a “preventative service” and will only pay for the visit and vaccine during your child’s yearly preventative exam.   If this is the case, your options are to request the vaccine during the yearly preventative exam (remember it will only be available fall/winter), pay out of pocket, or go to a clinic where no office visit is charged (Health Department, Kroger’s, Walgreen’s, etc).

Back to Top

When should I be worried about a fever?
Fever is a natural part of any infection and is a sign that your child’s immune system is responding appropriately.  The body’s average temperature is 98.6 degrees F orally but there are normal fluctuations throughout the day.  As pediatricians, we consider a temperature ≥ 100.4 to be a fever.  Fevers can be treated by increasing fluid intake and acetaminophen or ibuprofen (only if older than 6 months) if causing discomfort.

  • If ≤ 3 months old, notify physician immediately for fever ≥ 100.4 rectally.  Do not give any medicine unless instructed by your physician.
  • If 3-6 months old, notify physician for fever ≥ 102 rectally.  Also call if fever lasts > 3 days or worrisome symptoms develop, such as worsening cough, earache, weakness, vomiting, increased irritability, etc.
  • If > 6 months, careful observation is appropriate.  Call if fever lasts > 3 days or worrisome symptoms develop, such as worsening cough, earache, weakness, vomiting, increased irritability, etc.

Back to Top

How can I help my child who has a cough?
Cough is a very common symptom of a viral upper respiratory infection (common cold).  You can help minimize cough by providing a humidified environment (using a humidifier in your child’s room and/or allowing your child to breathe in the steamy air from a hot shower) and elevating the head of your child’s bed.  If your child is over 3 months of age, you can give warm fluids to relax the airway and loosen the phlegm.  If your child is over 12 months of age, you can use 1 teaspoon of honey.  Over-the-counter cough medicines are not recommended.  They have no proven benefit and are not approved for children under age 4 years old.  In general, we want to encourage a productive cough, not stop it.  If you decide to use a cough syrup for your child greater than 4 years old, we recommend one with the active ingredient dextromethorphan (DM).

Back to Top

My child is vomiting.  What can I do?
The most common cause of vomiting in children is an acute viral gastroenteritis (stomach virus).  Stomach viruses usually also cause some diarrhea and fever.  The largest risk to your child is becoming dehydrated.  Encourage your child to drink small amounts of rehydration solution (pedialyte) or clear liquids frequently (1 teaspoon every 3-5 minutes) and advance as tolerated.  Restart solid foods only after liquids have been tolerated for several hours.  If vomiting persists alone, is accompanied by severe pain, or you are concerned about dehydration, notify your physician immediately.  Signs of dehydration are decreased urination (no urine in 8 hours), dry tongue and mouth (not lips), absent tears, irritability, weakness, or in infants, a depressed or sunken soft spot.

Back to Top

My child has diarrhea.  What can I do?
Diarrhea is most commonly caused by acute viral gastroenteritis (stomach virus).  It is important to note that diarrhea may persist beyond other symptoms of a stomach virus for up to two weeks.  Do not use over-the-counter anti-diarrheal medicines; they are not safe in children.  Focus on increasing fluid intake to avoid dehydration.  Milk and milk products may exacerbate diarrhea; however, recent medical evidence suggests giving probiotics (in yogurt or separately) to help recolonize healthy intestinal flora, thereby decreasing the duration and severity of diarrhea.  Call your physician for signs of dehydration such as decreased urination (no urine in 8 hours), dry tongue and mouth (not lips), absent tears, irritability, weakness, or in infants, a depressed or sunken soft spot.

Back to Top

My child is constipated. What can I do?
Constipation is a frequent problem in young children.  Signs of constipation are large, hard, compact stools that are painful and difficult to pass.  There may be blood in or outside the stool and soiling between bowel movements may be associated.  Constipation may even cause intermittent abdominal pain.  For infants, a small amount of water or prune juice (1 ounce) may be given daily.  After 6 months of age, fruits such as prunes/peaches/pears may help regulate stools.  For toddlers, focus on increasing daily water intake, adding high-fiber and whole grain foods to the diet, and limiting dairy intake to 3 servings per day.  You should also develop a toilet routine for your child and promote physical activity.  Do not give your child laxatives, enemas, or other products without being seen by your physician first.

Back to Top

Is my child teething?
Primary teeth typically erupt between 4 and 12 months of age. 
It is a natural processSmall Hands that can cause a constellation of mild
symptoms.  You can comfort your child with teething rings, objects to massage their gums, or pacifiers.  Ibuprofen (for infants > 6 months) or acetaminophen and orajel may be used intermittently as well.

Back to Top

 

office info

Parent's Corner Newborn Care Booklet FAQS Meet the Doctors Meet the Staff

   © 2018 Wilkes & Warner Pediatrics. All Rights Reserved.

 

Website by: LWD
Logsdon Web Development Logo